GP Toolkit

GP Toolkit

General Practitioners

Career Opportunities Hub

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Demystifying NHS bodies and wider organisations

Next Generation GP

NHS Leadership Academy Programmes

NHS South West Leadership Academy

Primary Care Academy South West

The King's Fund

Dr. Kirsty Alexander

Dr. Shaba Nabi

Health Education England Roadmap Clinical Supervisor Course

RCGP Mentoring Opportunities

University Of Bristol Professional Mentor to Medical Students

First5 RCGP

Next Generation GP

GPs with Extended Roles

Profiles of Local Clinicians with portfolio GPs

Medical Education

AISMA Guide to Becoming a GP Partner

Online Articles

New to Partnership Payment Scheme

Applied Research Collaboration West

Health Inequalities

NHS England Improvement Fundamentals

Primary Care Academy South West

Somerset GP Education Trust

The King's Fund

The Q Community

West of England Academic Health Science Network (WEAHSN)

Somerset GP Education Trust

Avon LMC GP Safe House & COPE Scheme

BMA Well-Being Support Services

GP Return to Work Refresher Course

Healthier Together Support Hub

Looking After You Too

Our Frontline: Mental Health at Work

Our NHS People

Practitioner Health

Return-to-work GP Buddy Meetings

Somerset GP Education Trust

Avon Local Medical Committee

GP Career Support Hub

First5 RCGP

The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) have a First5 community for those five-years-post completion of training. There are opportunities for peer support groups as well as a variety of resources available to help the transition.

Further information and local First5 contacts can be found at the website via the button below.

The Severn Faculty section of the RCGP website also has some information about local contacts, accessible via the second button below.

Next Generation GP

Next Generation GP is a nationally-funded leadership programme. It is targeted at early career GPs and is also a good opportunity for local networking and peer support.

There are local programmes which run periodically throughout the year with events focusing on a variety of topics, including profiles from local leaders and portfolio career GPs.

Details for NextGen Bristol and how to apply for the local programme can be found via the button below, at their website. The rest of the website has other resources including nationally-applicable podcasts and a newsletter.

Next Generation GP

Next Generation GP is a nationally-funded leadership programme. It is targeted at early career GPs and is also a good opportunity for local networking and peer support.

There are local programmes which run periodically throughout the year with events focusing on a variety of topics, including profiles from local leaders and portfolio career GPs.

Details for NextGen Bristol and how to apply for the local programme can be found via the button below, at their website. The rest of the website has other resources including nationally-applicable podcasts and a newsletter.

NHS South West Leadership Academy

NHS South West Leadership Academy runs a variety of free courses / programmes focused on developing leadership skills and coaching.

Information on forthcoming opportunities can be found at their site, via the button below.

NHS Leadership Academy Programmes

The NHS Leadership Academy runs a number of FREE online programmes, targeted at clinicians in different leadership positions.

For more information, please visit the Leadership Academy’s website.

Association of Independent Specialist Medical Accountants (AISMA) Guide to Becoming a GP Partner

This document has a comprehensive summary of the various facets you would need to consider when thinking about partnership. It is accessible here via the button below.

Please note: these resource(s) come from private companies, but the information is freely available. BNSSG Training Hub does not have any affiliation with these companies nor receive any funding.

Online Articles

Here are a few helpful online articles from a variety of resources which have further details about different elements involved in partnership:

Please note: these resource(s) come from private companies, but the information is freely available. BNSSG Training Hub does not have any affiliation with these companies nor receive any funding.

New to Partnership Payment Scheme

For those considering partnership, there is a New to Partnership Payment Scheme (N2PP) which provides financial support for new partners.

Further details are available from their site, accessible via the button below.

Somerset GP Education Trust

Somerset GP Education Trust has a section on quality improvement with links to several introductory videos, available via the button below.

Somerset GP Education Trust

Somerset GP Education Trust (SGPET) have some helpful e-Learning resources focusing specifically on skills for telephone triage.

These resources can be found on SGPET’s website.

Somerset GP Education Trust

Somerset GP Education Trust (SGPET) have some helpful e-Learning resources on professional well-being.

These resources can be found on SGPET’s website.

Practitioner Health

This free confidential service offers timely and comprehensive healthcare for all doctors on the GMC (or who have been within the last 12 months), on a self-referral basis. It is available for help with any mental health or addiction issue which may be affecting your working life.

Their details are:

Primary Care Academy South West

Founded by Health Education England (HEE) South West, the Primary Care Academy offers regular online learning sessions for primary care fellows working in the South West.

They also run a number of special interest groups focusing on other topics, such as:

  • Deprivation and Health Inequalities
  • Digital
  • Education
  • Greener Practice
  • Leadership
  • Quality Improvement
  • Research

For further details, and to receive updates about their events, please contact them at [email protected].

The King's Fund

The King’s Fund website has lots of resources, including blogs and podcasts, related to clinical leadership.

To access them, please click the button below.

Demystifying NHS bodies and wider organisations

This 30-minute video from the Derbyshire GP Taskforce provides a useful summary of various healthcare organisations – what the abbreviations stand for, what they mean, etc.

To watch the video, please click the button below.

Leader Profile: Dr. Shaba Nabi

Dr. Shaba Nabi is not only the Clinical Lead GP in a vibrant inner-city practice in Bristol, but also BNSSG CCG’s Clinical Lead for Prescribing.

Please find below her answers to questions we posed to her on the topic of leadership.

What does a typical working day look like for you in your current leadership position?

I am contracted to work 3 sessions per week, and I usually work these sessions on Tuesday and Thursday. There is no typical working day, but my work includes:

  • Attending meetings:
    • Clinical Executive Meeting
    • Area Prescribing Team Meeting
    • Formulary Meeting
    • Medicines Safety and Quality Meeting
    • Strategic Medicines Optimisation Meeting
    • Senior Management Team Meeting
    • Drugs Dependence Working Group
    • Polypharmacy Working Group
  • Meeting preparation:
    • Reading papers / documents
  • Work in group writing prescribing protocols
  • Delivering training:
    • Shared Decision Making
    • Polypharmacy
  • Communications:
    • Responding to emails from CCG pharmacists, GPs, and consultants
What are the key skills required for your role?
  • Self-awareness
  • Diplomacy
  • Relationship building
  • Good communication skills – verbally and in writing
  • Ability to digest / appraise large documents quickly
  • Evaluate and appraise clinical evidence
  • Critical thinking
  • Strategic thinking
  • Ability to work flexibly, sometimes to short notice deadlines
How did you become involved in your current leadership role?

I was originally the Clinical Lead for Cardiovascular Disease for Bristol, for 2.5 years. When the three CCGs merged, a new Prescribing Lead was developed.

I have always been enthusiastic about taking up a prescribing role, as I have been the prescribing lead for my practice since I first started working there. I applied for the role, interviewed, and was successful.

What does clinical leadership mean to you?

It means having a foot in two camps; one foot is in coalface clinical care, whilst the other is in strategic thinking for quality improvement.

Do you have any words of wisdom for people who may be looking to become involved in clinical leadership roles?
  • Have an interest in the role
  • Remain authentic
  • Manage your imposter syndrome – it never goes away, we just manage it better over time
  • Own up to your ignorance but don’t rely on it forever
  • It’s ok to make mistakes but own up to them
  • No one is perfect, everyone has flaws; accept yours and work on your strengths
  • You will always have conflicts of interest – don’t shy away from them but articulate them and remain true to yourself
  • Work to live!
Leader Profile: Dr. Kirsty Alexander

Dr. Kirsty Alexander is one of BNSSG CCG’s Clinical Lead for Children and Families, in addition to Co-Chair of the North and West Locality Integrated Care Partnership Board.

Please find below her answers to questions we posed to her on the topic of leadership.

What does a typical working day look like for you in your current leadership position?

Back-to-back Teams meetings from 8.00 – 18.00! I have lots of other meetings outside these hours (mostly informally, but they are essential to keeping pace and traction). These might include representing the North and West on the Governing Body Board Meeting, attending locality meetings, or a number of meetings relating to Children and Young People work.

The latter meetings include system strategy — considering how to reduce gang warfare, evaluating county lines, ensuring timely health & education plans, reducing the number of children excluded from school, improving asthma pathways, and reducing patient numbers in emergency departments (i.e., prevention right the way through to end-of-life care).

What are the key skills required for your role?
  • Broad perspective, patience and persistence – it can take a very, very long time to get anything to change…
  • It’s not essential, but it helps to have had full Public Health training, so you’ll know how to write strategies, business cases and evaluate services (though I don’t have to do this myself anymore!)
  • What is vital is to recognise that it is all about collaborating and relationships — listening to others, understanding things from their perspective, working in and as a team to get things done.
How did you become involved in your current leadership role?

I trained for general practice, and went on to train to become a Consultant in Public Health. I was a consultant for 5 years, before choosing to focus on clinical work as a GP and using my public health skills in the world of commissioning. The latter requires a population-based perspective, ideally informed by evidence.

It helps to understand Health Economics, a bit about epidemiology, finance, etc., and to combine that with clinical experience of frontline working. Through my public health training, I undertook some managerial and leadership skills courses. Managerial skills can be helpful (e.g., project management), but the leadership training often most usefully involves really understanding ourselves and our effect on others.

What does clinical leadership mean to you?

It means being able to hold a long-term vision of an improved service outcome for a patient population, whilst remaining firmly rooted in clinical service delivery.

It’s vital for credibility that colleagues know I am also delivering the service we are aspiring to improve. I view it as servant leadership — i.e., I am here to not just to serve for the benefits of patients, but also to support my colleagues, who are likewise doing their bit to make things better.

Do you have any words of wisdom for people who may be looking to become involved in clinical leadership roles?

Ask yourself: what is it you really want?

Some of the most effective leaders haven’t even thought about that; they are just passionate about improving a service, and find ways to do that, without ever having a ‘leadership’ role. Some of them are exceptionally effective because they don’t get involved in formal structures but just crack on and do things (asking for forgiveness, rather than permission).

Take opportunities as they arise. Put your hand up when someone asks for a person to help with any sort of initiative — no matter how small.  For example, in general practice, we often need someone to take the lead on a pathway. Just say yes and give it a go, asking for help along the way. From small beginnings, you build both knowledge and experience of how to get things done.

Other options include doing an MBA or other courses that broaden your intellectual skills set, which can then be applied in clinical settings.

Primary Care Academy South West

Founded by Health Education England (HEE) South West, the Primary Care Academy offers regular online learning sessions for primary care fellows working in the South West.

They also run a number of special interest groups focusing on other topics, such as:

  • Deprivation and Health Inequalities
  • Digital
  • Education
  • Greener Practice
  • Leadership
  • Quality Improvement
  • Research

For further details, and to receive updates about their events, please contact them at [email protected].

Applied Research Collaboration West

ARC West run free training courses and support for those planning quality improvement courses. Information about their events and resources are available at their site, accessible below.

They also have online videos to help plan a service evaluation:

The King’s Fund

The King’s Fund has resources, including blogs and podcasts, covering topics involving quality improvement.

These can be accessed on their site.

The Q Community

The Q Community is an initiative to connect people with expertise in improvement in healthcare.

If you are interested, more information can be found at their site.

NHS England Improvement Fundamentals

NHS England have a series of online courses covering a variety of quality improvement topics, available via the button below.

West of England Academic Health Science Network (WEAHSN)

The West of England Academic Health Science Network (WEAHSN) provide free quality improvement training, with upcoming events available on their website. Their site also hosts a comprehensive PDF Guide to Quality Improvement.

For a list of WEAHSN’s available virtual resources and upcoming training [from September 2021March 2022]:

Furthermore, there are toolkits available for:

Health Inequalities

The King’s Fund has further resources on the topics of:


Fairhealth is a charity that works to reduce health inequalities and has several e-learning modules and online resources available at their site.


Public Health England’s Local Knowledge and Intelligence Service, in partnership with NHSEI and Health Education England (HEE), have developed three e-learning modules on population health management.


South West Population and Public Health Academy have resources / webinars related to health inequalities, with details about events available from their website.


The Health Foundation is a charity that focuses on health inequalities. They have a variety of online resources including webinars / podcasts / articles on these topics. More information can be found at their site.

Health Education England Roadmap Clinical Supervisor Courses

Health Education England (HEE) are running two-day courses training supervisors to support clinicians through HEE’s Roadmaps to Practice.

For more information, below use the button below to download the flyer.

RCGP Mentoring Opportunities

The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) has a mentoring scheme through which you can request to receive mentoring, or become a mentor yourself.

Further details on the scheme can be accessed through their website.

University of Bristol Professional Mentor to Medical Students

The University of Bristol runs a professional mentor scheme for their medical students. They often look for clinicians to volunteer to mentor a group of first-year medical students, whom you would then support for the duration of their undergraduate training.

Further details are available in the downloadable document below.

Additionally, you can also contact:

Medical Education
Medical Education Training
Foundations of Medical Education Course:

The University of Bristol offers a FREE Foundations of Medical Education course for clinicians involved in teaching undergraduate students. The course comprises 4 sessions, with delegates choosing which to attend. Completing all sessions provides 10 credits towards the Teaching and Learning for Health Professionals PG Certificate.

Further details about the course structure and how to apply are available at the University of Bristol’s site. Please click here for more.


Health Education England (HEE) South West Faculty

Health Education England (HEE) South West also run a variety of short events throughout the year on a variety of topics, including motivational interviewing, resilience and provision of feedback, and facilitating small group teaching.

Further details can be found at their site by clicking here.


Teaching and Learning for Healthcare Professionals

The University of Bristol has developed a Teaching and Learning for Healthcare Professionals qualification. This is for those interested in pursuing a higher level of study, with options including a postgraduate certificate, diploma and a full Masters’.

For more information on each option and relevant course fees, please click here to visit the University of Bristol’s site.


University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care

The University of Bristol also runs a variety of FREE workshops for clinicians that teach their students.

For details of forthcoming events, and of who to contact, please click here to visit the University of Bristol’s site.

Becoming a Trainer for GP Registrars

There are routes to become either a clinical supervisor (for F2s / GPST1 and 2) or an education supervisor (which also includes supervision of GPST3s).

The Severn Deanery’s website features detailed information on the requirements for becoming an educational supervisor, as well as the requirements for becoming a training practice. The application forms can be found on their site. All of this can be found at their site, here.

Particular requirements to note are:

  • Applicants must have MRCGP
  • Supervisors must have been on the General Medical Council (GMC) GP Register for 3 years or more, with at least 1 year in their current practice

If you are interested in these opportunities, you would need to initially book on to a Potential Clinical Supervisor Course / Potential Educational Supervisor Course. Enquiries can be made to [email protected].

Once your chosen course is completed, an approval visit to the practice is required. This is arranged by the Bristol GP Programme Manager, Mandy Price, whom can also put you in touch with the Training Programme Director Team, if you’d like to discuss the role further.

Mandy can be reached at [email protected].

Teaching Medical Students

There are lots of opportunities to teach medical students from the University of Bristol. This can be both in practice and at the university.

Teaching happens in the community during all five student years, ranging from small group teaching with expert patients to apprenticeship-style teaching over longer placements.

The Centre for Academic Primary Care Teaching website provides an overview of all the teaching on offer, including opportunities to do so centrally at the university and courses to develop your skills.

If you are interested in teaching, or just wish to keep up-to-date with available opportunities, please email [email protected]. The monthly teaching newsletter contains details of all upcoming opportunities.

Profiles of Local Clinicians with portfolio GPs
Dr. Ashish Bhatia | Well-being

Role:

“I work as a GP, Bristol medical school tutor, advisor to the British Holistic Medical Association and founder of an organisation called Humble (www.humble.info). I am currently training a group of doctors in an accredited training in holistic approaches to health and performance optimization (graduates being certificated and insurable to practice as Humble Guides.)”


How did you start the process of becoming a GP this specific portfolio role?

“I’ve been inquisitive about holistic approaches to health for years. Having taught aspects of whole person care (specialising in sleep and behaviour design) at Bristol University, I began running free NHS well-being groups in my practice. The results were so profound that I now support individuals, schools, and organisations as well as teaching health professionals.”


Do you need any supervision and if so, how did you arrange this?

“I am fortunate to have the support of many experienced mentors and peers. I have 2 supervisors currently. Having been approached by many doctors requesting my guidance and supervision, I have established a group called Humble Pioneers, which offers peer support and supervision, whilst inspiring me to keep learning too.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

“Although I am trained as a GP, CBT I practitioner, yoga teacher, and massage practitioner, I find love, integrity, and experience trump my qualifications.”


How do you demonstrate ongoing competence in the area and are there any specific requirements to do this?

“I spend 3 hours a week ‘keeping up-to-date‘. About quarterly, I present my findings and explore my needs with my supervisors and annually at appraisal.”


What do you feel having this additional role brings to your career?

“The holistic work I do has transformed my life and clinical practice, bringing new skills, joy and wonder to my work. It also helps with my self-care, my abilities to support my clinical teams, and inspired my research and publications.”

Dr. Susie Davies | Founder of Parents Against Phone Addiction in Young People (PAPAYA) Charity

What is your role?

“4 session salaried GP, GP mentor, OOH clinician, founder PAPAYA.”


How did you start the process of becoming a GP with this specific portfolio role? 

“I set up PAPAYA (Parents Against Phone Addiction in Young People) due to my concerns regarding the increased mental health problems in young people.

Over several years, my personal learning was focused on young people’s mental health through online CBT courses, training events, and personal reading. I spent 18 months working at Student Health Services and became familiar with managing complex mental health problems and the potential links between anxiety / low mood and social media and gaming.

I started researching possible causal links especially between the impact of social media on self-esteem and as a result set up a charity to get a better balance with technology. I run workshops for young people on how to build their self-esteem and use technology well, as well as giving media interviews on the subject.”


Do you need any supervision and if so, how did you arrange this?

“I had significant help from the in-house psychologist at Student Health Services, although this was on an informal basis.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

Online learning and courses in young people’s mental health, suicide prevention, qualification in CBT. I have done a lot of personal reading and research, joined forums, and watched lots of TED talks. However, I have learnt most through running workshops and listening to young people.”


If applicable, how do you demonstrate ongoing competence in this area and are there any specific requirements to do this?

“Every year I include mental health updates as part of my personal development plan. I read all new studies and reports that come out and record them as part of a learning log.”


What do you feel having this additional role brings to your career overall? 

“Running PAPAYA has helped me feel like I can make a difference to the mental health of young people. I really enjoy interacting with them and it has given me an increased sense of purpose. I have enjoyed giving talks and radio interviews.”

Dr. Jonathan Rees | Urology

What is your role?

“GP Partner at Tyntesfield Medical Group, plus working in Community Urology Clinics in BNSSG, Gloucestershire, and Swindon.”


How did you start the process of becoming a GP with an extended role?

“I did surgical training (MRCS 1999) and then 3 years as Urology Research Fellow (MD 2003), which had a clinical element in addition. When I switched to GP in 2004, I wanted to keep my urology interest active and approached the local consultants – I did some work for private consultants in Bristol (cystoscopies, prostate biopsies), before the community urology service was set up in 2008 – I have worked in this service since then.”


How did you arrange a supervisor (if applicable)?

“I do not have a formal supervisor – however, I am one of 3 directors of my company Shire Health that works with GP care to provide these clinics. My fellow director Mr. Biral Patel is a urologist in Cheltenham and is always my source of urological advice and mentorship when needed. I also liaise closely with the 6 consultants who work for us.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

“When I started there was no requirement for any specific qualification, and I have not been asked since – however, I have clinical experience as well as the formal exams mentioned above.”


How do you demonstrate ongoing competence in the speciality and are there any specific requirements?

“Again, this is not formally assessed other than in my annual appraisal. I do a lot of teaching which often involves attending conferences and study days – my urology CPD each year is pretty extensive.”


What do you feel being a GPwER brings to your career overall?

“I do 6 sessions as a GP partner and am executive / managing partner for our 4 sites. Doing the urology clinics allows me some external perspective, a change of emphasis – and also, I find having a specialist role is good for professional self-esteem.

As a GP we are expected to know something about everything, which can leave you feeling a bit like you don’t know enough about anything! Having an area in which you feel confident and knowledgeable is definitely good for the psyche.”

Dr. Paula Rostek | Lipidology

What is your role?

“GPwSI in Lipidology.”


How did you start the process of becoming a GP with an extended role? 

“My colleague mentioned the Biochemistry team at the BRI were struggling to recruit for their new GPwSI in Lipidology posts.  I applied after speaking to one of the Biochemistry Consultants RE what the role involved, and after applying got the job alongside another GPwSI. I received on the job training and the department kindly part-funded me to do the “Certificate of excellence in lipidology“. I’ve been there for 2 1/2 years now. It was very much being in the right place at the right time sort of thing I think.”


How did you arrange a supervisor (if applicable)? 

“I am supervised in clinic by one of the BRI biochemistry consultants.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

MRCGP


How do you demonstrate ongoing competence in the speciality and are there any specific requirements? 

“I have a yearly Lipid Clinic appraisal. I also demonstrate my competencies on a weekly basis as after clinic our team which consists of a consultant, a registrar, a speciality nurse, and myself discuss our management plans of the patients we have seen. I also attend the European Society of Atherosclerosis congress each year.”


What do you feel being a GPwER brings to your career overall? 

“I find the lipid clinics really satisfying as it is allowing me to learn a lot about a sub-speciality and go out and do improvement projects and teaching with primary care. This helps make me feel more valued as a clinician. The sense of unity you get in secondary care is a lot less isolating than primary care work as we run the clinics very much as a team.

In secondary care I generally have much more time to do my clinical and admin work – I feel that I am better able to give a gold standard of assessment and care to patients than the often rushed clinics I have to do in primary care. The constant learning and chance to be involved in a field that encompasses new drugs, genetics and CVD is exciting and interesting.”

Dr. Jasmin Krischer | Training Programme Director (and variety of other roles)

What is your role?

  • “GP at Student Health Service for 3 years
  • Previously mainstream GP for 20+ yrs
  • I’m also an appraiser, and a TPD and I have started my own charity: HappyMaps
  • In the past I have had many different roles and jobs including:
    • Clinical and educational supervisor
    • Facilitating communication skills teaching and mentoring for med students
    • Part-time clinical assistantships in Dermatology and in Paediatrics (at different times and combined with GP)
    • Working for NGOs in Sudan and East Timor”

How did you start the process of becoming a GP with this specific portfolio role?

“Teaching / mentoring roles are often advertised via the med school or deanery and you can be added to those mailing lists. To be an appraiser, you have to do training and that is advertised a couple of times a year – there are quite a few young appraisers so it’s not just for older GPs! There are lots of ways you can combine GP with working abroad from expedition medicine to shorter stints working for NGOs or volunteering e.g. for PHASE.”


Do you need any supervision and if so, how did you arrange this?

“Some of these roles are supervised / appraised, e.g., being an appraiser or TPD but not all.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

“In general, just being interested and keen!  For my clinical assistantship in Paediatrics, I had already done a fair bit of Paediatrics, but for Dermatology I didn’t know any more than the average GP – I just helped in clinics. For the work abroad, the Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene is very helpful.”


If applicable, how do you demonstrate ongoing competence in this area and are there any specific requirements to do this? 

“For your annual appraisal as a GP, you are generally required to show you have done some learning relevant to each role.”


What do you feel having this additional role brings to your career overall? 

Variety is the key to staying motivated and avoiding burn-out! Teaching / appraising keeps your own knowledge fresh as well and avoids feeling isolated. Once you’ve started adding some extra roles, you realise you can chop and change every few years depending on what grabs your interest at the time and, of course, what opportunities happen to come up.”

Dr. Kayo Forster | Undergraduate Medical Education

What is your role?

  • “GP
  • Academy GP Lead – North and South Bristol Academy
  • Year 5 tutor – South Bristol Academy

How did you start the process of becoming a GP with this specific portfolio role?

“I’ve always had an interest in Teaching and Education and this was helped by my foundation years taking place in a teaching hospital where the expectation was that we all teach the medical students. I started the process by gaining a Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education at this stage. I made sure I took up opportunities to teach when they came up during GP training.”


Do you need any supervision and if so, how did you arrange this?

“I’ve always been a great fan of Mentoring. When I qualified as a newly qualified GP I moved to the South West and felt the need to be mentored to gain advice on how to get started in a portfolio career in medical education. I signed up to the RCGP mentorship scheme which was a pivotal moment which I hugely benefitted from. I talked to more senior GPs within medical education who supported me by sending me roles and opportunities when they came up.”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

“Experience in teaching medical students and a medical education qualification desirable. As well as MRCGP.”


If applicable, how do you demonstrate ongoing competence in this area and are there any specific requirements to do this? 

“For your annual appraisal as a GP, you are generally required to show you have done some learning relevant to each role.”


What do you feel having this additional role brings to your career overall? 

“Much needed variety to my working work. Enjoyment! Lots of opportunities for progression and career progression.”

Dr. Jane Edge | Sexual Health

What is your role?

“GP Partner at Horfield Health Centre and Faculty Registered Trainer (FRT).”


How did you start the process of becoming a GP with this specific portfolio role?

“I realised the importance of providing good contraceptive choice to women early in my career. I was a GP in Student Health immediately after qualifying and in my first GP partnership was asked to train to fit coils. I had a false start in training as an FRT – I attended the two day training pregnant with my 4th child and quickly moved cities. I was unable to pursue the necessary practical training at that time.

On arriving in Bristol 22 years ago I did some sessional work at Brook and for the Sexual Health Service. The work was and probably still is not well remunerated but it was rewarding, slower pace than GP and consolidated my contraceptive skills.

12 years ago I did the Clinical Supervisor training to become an F2 supervisor and realised that this would meet the training requirements for the FRT. FRT training has changed since that time. I then had a sabbatical from my partnership and pursued the practical training at what is now Unity.”


Do you need any supervision and if so, how did you arrange this?

“Yes. You are supported by the local Training Programme Director and an experienced FRT buddy.

In Bristol the TPD is Dr. Cindy Farmer.

It is best to contact Fay Webb – Executive Assistant To The Triumvirate (TRI) Team, Unity Sexual Health Centre at [email protected].”


What qualifications did you need to undertake this role?

This is from the FSRH website:

“You must hold the following:

    • A current NMC or GMC registration with a licence to practice.
    • You hold a DFSRH, MFSRH or FFSRH.
    • Your membership is current and you are up to date with recertification.

As well as confirming:

    • You have at least 12 months current experience in SRH.

You must hold relevant qualification or accreditation in medical education. We accept any of the following:

    • Postgraduate course in Medical Education for Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (University of Keele or Worcester) within the last 5 years. (NO plans for this course to run currently) 
    • Current GMC approved GP Trainer
    • Current GMC Recognised Trainer
    • Successful completion within the last 5 years of a university accredited postgraduate course in medical/clinical/healthcare teaching or education, with a minimum of 15 credits at Levels 6 or 7.
    • Successful completion of Academy of Medical Educators (AoME) accredited courses (within the last 5 years). We do not accept all AoME accredited courses and therefore may request additional information to support your application.
    • Current Member or Fellow of the AoME. (Associate and Student membership not applicable.)
    • Successful completion of a Advance Higher Education (Advance HE) (formerly known as the Higher Education Academy (HEA)) accredited course (within the last 5 years). We may request additional information to support your application.
    • Current Fellow, Senior Fellow or Principal Fellow of the HEA.

FRT applicants have recently submitted the courses below as a way to meeting the medical/clinical/healthcare education requirements to become an FRT. Please note that we are NOT recommending these courses as all applicants’ needs are different. We are just providing them as examples of courses that have met our requirements, but you will need to check the content yourself carefully if you decide to take them as institutions change modules, level, and credit value from time to time.

  • AoME Accredited Educational and Clinical Supervisor course from Miad Healthcare. On completion of this course, you will need to attach with your FRT application form certificates showing that you have successfully completed the two webinars, two e-learning modules, a copy of your assessed reflection report, and a copy of the assessor’s feedback that all form part of this course.
  • Teaching and Learning in Health Professions Education module from University College London Medical School. On completion of this course, you will need to attach your full course transcript showing your marks for the module with your FRT application form.

Many of you will be planning to undertake a course that is not listed above. If you would like to check whether it would meet our requirements, please email [email protected] with the full details of the course, including the level, number of credits, module descriptor including learning outcomes, and details of how the course is assessed. We will then review the course content and let you know whether it would be valid as part of your FRT application.”


If applicable, how do you demonstrate ongoing competence in this area and are there any specific requirements to do this? 

“Reaccreditation is every 5 years – best to check the FSRH website for full details of the requirement.”


What do you feel having this additional role brings to your career overall? 

“It is my area of expertise as a GP in my practice.

I lead on Women’s Health and the educational aspect of training keeps me up to date.

I have been able to support GP trainees and nurses at the practice to complete their DFSRH and LoC-IUT and LoC-DSI.

On one occasion I did DFSRH, LoC-SDI and LoC-IUT training with an experienced GP from another GP surgery. I was paid by the GP for the DFSRH training and at that time there was a local fund for LARC training which paid for the rest.

I now have an honorary contract with Bayer and train GPs and Nurses in LoC-IUT – I am paid £300 per session for this training

I attend local FRT training and am invited to a national training meeting run by Bayer.”

GPs with Extended Roles

For most specialities, there is not a specifically-designed pathway for becoming a GP with an extended role (GPwER). The Royal College of General Practitioner (RCGP) website has details about the general requirements for the competency assessment, but the best advice is to establish local requirements with the relevant employer and commissioners.

For more information, please click here to visit the RCGP site.
Please expand the collapsible boxes below, too.

GPwER Dermatology and Skin Surgery

The RCGP, British Association of Dermatology (BAD), and Primary Care Dermatology Society have published a framework for dermatology and skin surgery as part of a national dermatology accreditation process.

For more information about this framework, please click here.

Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health Diploma

More detailed information about how you can apply for the FSRH Diploma is available from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health’s website.

For more information about this diploma, please click here.

How to Get Involved in Primary Care Research

The University of Bristol’s Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) has details of how to get involved in primary care research, and they have a newsletter that can be signed up to via the button below.

Primary Care Academic Collaborative (PACT) is a network of primary care health professionals involved in research. Information about how to get involved / sign up is available on their site, which can be accessed via the button below.

Avon Local Medical Committee (Avon LMC)

There are a variety of resources available on Avon LMC’s website. If your practice is a member, you should have access to them. If not, there is a fee to join.

Their resources include:

For more information on membership, please click the button below.

Avon LMC GP Safe House & COPE Scheme

This a virtual safe house for GPs, in which you can access support, advice, and guidance. The COPE Scheme provides counselling and coaching.

For more, please use the button below.

BMA Well-Being Support Services

The British Medical Association’s (BMA) confidential counselling and peer support services, available online or over the phone for all doctors and medical students (plus their partners and dependents), round the clock.

You do not need to be a BMA member to access these services. Simply call 0330 123 1245 or visit their site using the button below.

GP Return to Work Refresher Course

This FREE one-day course, organised by our GP Fellow Dr. Pamela Curtis, is designed to support GPs returning from a short career break (be it parental leave, sick leave, etc.). It will run on Thursday 11 November, from 9.00 – 16.00.

The session will be covering time management, the “new” appraisal process, consultation skills, useful clinical updates, and signposting to resources. An amazing career coach will be on-hand to guide you, and you will be able to network with GPs in a similar position.

For more information, please click the button below.

Return-to-work GP Buddy Meetings

Organised by our GP Fellow Dr. Pamela Curtis, these monthly Buddy Meetings for GPs returning to work from short career breaks will provide a safe space to discuss the things that matter to you. This can be clinical work, career goals, or well-being – and it can be in a format of your choosing (as a ‘study group’, via action learning sets, etc.). It is hoped these will increase the confidence of and support for GPs returning to practice.

Sessions will be held on the last Wednesday of the next couple of months.

For more information, please click the button below.

Healthier Together Support Hub

This a local well-being resource hub, available to GPs.

To access it, please click the button below.

Looking After You Too

This is an easy-to-access, individually-tailored, FREE coaching support service for frontline primary care staff working during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its opening hours are as follows:

  • Monday – Friday | 8.00 – 22.00
  • Saturday – Sunday | 10.00 – 18.00

To access it, please click the button below.

Our Frontline: Mental Health at Work

Round-the-clock, one-to-one support, by call or text, from trained volunteers, plus resources, tips, and ideas to look after your mental health.

To access it, please click the button below.

Our NHS People

Our NHS People provides a general support helpline (from 7.00 – 23.00, every day) and a round-the-clock text support service. They also have a bereavement support helpline, open from 8.00 – 20.00 every day.

To reach their general support helpline, please contact 0300 131 7000
To use their text service, please send FRONTLINE to 85258
To reach their bereavement helpline, please contact 0300 303 4434

To visit Our NHS People’s website, please click the button below.

GP Career Support Hub

The GP Career Support Hub is a national resource for GPs, containing a wealth of information on numerous topics. Their resources include signposts to opportunities appropriate at all career stages, funded GP support schemes, training, and well-being resources.

To access the Hub, you will need to register an account on the Future NHS Collaboration Platform, before selecting the GP Career Support Hub under ‘Find a Workspace’.

For more, please use the button below.

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